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Teacher Training Education for VET Teachers in India

  • Matthias PilzEmail author
  • Uma Gengaiah
Reference work entry

Abstract

Training teachers to impart quality Vocational Education and Training (VET) to learners is a worldwide concern. Technology keeps upgrading and changing in a rapid phase. Teachers have a responsibility to upgrade their knowledge, and the same must be imparted to learners. Simultaneously, there have been debates in the field of education regarding whether the profession of teaching is a “vocation” or “calling.” Considering these two sides of a model, we need to analyze how prospective teachers identify teaching as a vocation and how vocation operates in one’s own life. If teaching itself is a vocation, teachers themselves gain knowledge and know the existing social practices to choose the vocation. One needs to cultivate real interest in teaching to keep the students attentive, if he/she chooses teaching as a profession. More than that, preparing students to become learned professionals and showing the path to discover their own vocation are a challenging task. In this context, this chapter discusses how Indian teachers in VET choose teaching as a profession in VET and how they constantly upgrade their knowledge in the changing situation.

On the one hand, the chapter gives an overview of the Indian VET system and teacher training in VET in India. On the other hand, it discusses the aspects mentioned above by focusing on the existing literature in the field and empirical findings of teaching quality in the different regions of India.

Keywords

Teaching as a vocation Indian education system Indian VET system Teacher training in VET 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of CologneCologneGermany
  2. 2.Indira Gandhi National Open UniversityNew DelhiIndia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Volker Wedekind

There are no affiliations available

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