Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2019 Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Bioconstruction

  • William T. FoxEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93806-6_46

The term, bioconstruction, usually refers to a bioconstructed limestone that has been built-up by colonial and sediment-binding organisms including algae, corals, bryozoans, and stromatoporoids. The term, bioconstructed limestone, was introduced by Carozzi and Zadnik (1959) in their study of the Silurian Wabash reef in southern Indiana. The word, bioconstructed, was used to distinguish the limestones and dolomites which were found in a reef from the dolomitic calcarinites preserved in the reef flanks and the dolomitic shales in the country rock (Carozzi and Zadnik 1959). The term, bioconstruction, was next applied to Devonian stromatoporoid reefs in the Beaverhill Lake Formation, Upper Devonian, Alberta Canada (Carozzi 1961).

European Use of the Word Bioconstruction

The word, bioconstruction, was widely accepted and used in European geologic journals, but has not appeared in any North American journals since 1961. The European use of the term, bioconstruction, includes what the North...

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Bibliography

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geology, Center for Environmental StudiesWilliams CollegeWilliamstownUSA