Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

2019 Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Monitoring Coastal Ecology

  • J. Pat DoodyEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-93806-6_218

Introduction: Human Action

Early human coastal development was probably in harmony with coastal processes, modifying the habitats rather than destroying them. As human populations have increased and land-use intensified, these habitats have come under greater pressure. Intensive agriculture, afforestation, and infrastructure development, including the mass tourism boom in many areas, have resulted in the destruction of natural areas especially along the shores of the Mediterranean (Doody 1995). The impact on the environment increased the perception that coastal areas are vulnerable. This has led to the remaining areas, especially those dominated by “natural” landscapes, to be considered particularly precious. National and international legislation seeks to prevent further damage and destruction in these “fragile” environments.

Faced with mounting pressure on coastal and marine resources, there is increasing concern about the ability of the coast to sustain the many uses to which it is...

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.National Coastal ConsultantsBrampton, HuntingdonUK