Encyclopedia of Mathematics Education

Living Edition
| Editors: Steve Lerman

Pedagogical Content Knowledge Within “Mathematical Knowledge for Teaching”

  • Hamsa VenkatEmail author
  • Jill Adler
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-77487-9_123-5

Definition

Pedagogic content knowledge, in Shulman’s (1986, p. 7) terms, refers to: “the most powerful analogies, illustrations, examples, explanations, and demonstrations — […] the most useful ways of representing and formulating the subject that make it comprehensible to others.”

Characteristics

Intense focus on the notion of “pedagogical content knowledge” (PCK) within teacher education is attributed to Lee Shulman’s 1985 AERA Presidential address (Shulman 1986) in which he referred to PCK as the “special amalgam of content and pedagogy” central to the teaching of subject matter. His widely cited follow-up paper (Shulman 1987) elaborated PCK as follows:

the most powerful analogies, illustrations, examples, explanations, and demonstrations — […] the most useful ways of representing and formulating the subject that make it comprehensible to others…. Pedagogical content knowledge also includes an understanding of what makes the learning of specific topics easy or difficult: the...

Keywords

Pedagogic content knowledge Mathematical knowledge for teaching Lee Shulman Deborah Ball COACTIV 
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of the WitwatersrandJohannesburgSouth Africa

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mellony Graven
    • 1
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationRhodes UniversityGrahamstownSouth Africa