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Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES) in Cancer Patients

  • Bryan Bonder
  • Marcos de LimaEmail author
Reference work entry

Abstract

Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a frequently dramatic clinical disorder characterized by a constellation of symptoms with imaging correlates. Typically, patients present with changes in mental status, visual disturbances, headaches, seizures, or focal neurological deficits. Imaging findings are classically in a posterior vascular distribution; however, PRES has been now recognized to involve other areas of the central nervous system. Once thought to be highly associated with systemic hypertension, PRES has been identified to be secondary to a growing list of conditions and therapies. With the introduction of newer oncological drugs and more frequent usage of magnetic resonance imaging, PRES has been increasingly identified in cancer patients. Rapid recognition and intervention is critical to preventing morbidity or mortality.

Keywords

PRES Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome RPLS Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome Neurological emergency Seizure 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Hematology and OncologyUniversity Hospitals Cleveland Medical CenterClevelandUSA
  2. 2.Stem Cell Transplant Program, Seidman Cancer CenterUniversity Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, and Case Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Yenny Cardenas
    • 1
  1. 1.Critical Care DepartmentUniversidad del Rosario Hospital Universitario Fundacion Santa Fe deBogotaColombia

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