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Charles Darwin and the Darwinian Tradition

  • Janet Browne
Living reference work entry
Part of the Historiography of Science book series (HISTSC, volume 1)

Abstract

The chapter describes how historians have shifted from studying Darwin as an individual thinker to embrace a more panoramic cultural picture. Darwin’s rich archival record now reveals a great deal about nineteenth–century scientific practice. Fresh perspectives on evolutionary history and the so-called Darwinian revolution emerge by decentering Darwin.

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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