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The Matter of Practice in the Historiography of the Experimental Life Sciences

  • Hannah Landecker
Living reference work entry
Part of the Historiography of Science book series (HISTSC, volume 1)

Abstract

This chapter reviews the trajectory of the practice turn in histories of experimental biology. With a focus on “how to do things with practice,” the methodological implications of a focus on material practice are discussed. A map of the overlapping territories of experimental systems, epistemic things, biomedical platforms, visualization practices, and experimental bodies is traced out together with the source materials that are central to these approaches, such as gray literature, protocol manuals, and laboratory notebooks. The argument is presented that studies of literature, rhetoric, narrative and concept are not opposed to studies of material practice, and indeed present opportunities going forward for new syntheses and integration of approaches.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.UCLALos AngelesUSA

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