The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Climate Change and Public Health

  • Viktor FriedmannEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_627-1

Introduction

Climate change has a rapidly growing impact on public health and hence on both national and human security. The warming of the Earth’s atmosphere, driven by anthropogenic factors, transforms global and local climatic conditions and leads to more extreme weather patterns. Health security is affected by the resulting increase in the frequency of heat waves and other natural disasters, by worsening air pollution, and by indirect impacts on the prevalence of vector- and water-borne diseases, food security, and social stability, among other effects.

Climate change also impacts public health security in a deeper and more fundamental sense. Public health as a governmental activity originally developed as a mechanism of security aiming to manage overall processes at the level of the population, based on the natural regularities they display and on predictions and interventions that these patterns make possible. Climate change, as the continuous and relatively rapid transformation...

Keywords

Climate change Global security Health security Public health Resilience Vital systems security Vulnerability 
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Further Reading

  1. Brklacich, M., Chazan, M., & Bohle, H. G. (2009). Human security vulnerability, and global environmental change. In R. A. Matthew, J. Barnett, B. McDonald, & K. L. O’Brien (Eds.), Global environmental change and human security (pp. 35–51). Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  2. Gilman, N., Randall, D., & Schwartz, P. (2011). Climate change and ‘security.’ In J. S. Dryzek, R. B. Norgaard, & D. Schlosberg (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of climate change and society. Retrieved from https://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199566600.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199566600-e-17
  3. Levy, B., & Patz, J. (Eds.). (2015). Climate change and public health. Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Budapest Metropolitan UniversityBudapestHungary