The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Security and Citizenship

  • Oscar L. LarssonEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_279-1

Introduction

Security and citizenship are closely connected concepts, but their complicated relations have received scant attention in security studies. This is perhaps more understandable in respect to traditional and conventional security studies, which were concerned with how states interacted through “high politics,” military capability, and various alliances. This left little room for interest concerning the legal and political aspects of individuals and citizenship, even though populations could obviously be viewed as a material resource in relation to other states (Buzan et al. 1998). In contrast, the broader focus of “critical” security studies addresses new security objects and issues, directing increased attention to pertinent questions associated with individuals, groups, humanity, the environment, and terrorism. However, it has not always displayed an explicit concern with citizenship and the relevant regulations and institutional arrangements (Guillaume and Huysmans 2013)....

Keywords

States Regulation Individuals Rights (and the right to have rights) Duties Social contract theory Population 
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Further Reading

  1. Guillaume, X., & Huysmans, J. (2013). Citizenship and security: The constitution of political being. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Brown, W. (2010). Walled states, waning sovereignty. New York: Zone Books.Google Scholar
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  4. Bellamy, R. (2008). Citizenship – a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Nyers, P. (Ed.). (2009). Securitizations of citizenship. Abingdon: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Urban and Rural DevelopmentThe Swedish University of Agricultural StudiesUppsalaSweden