The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Global Security Studies

Living Edition
| Editors: Scott Romaniuk, Manish Thapa, Péter Marton

Human Security

  • Ayelet Harel-ShalevEmail author
  • Carmit Wolberg
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-74336-3_227-1

Introduction

The end of the Cold War marked a shift in the concept of security. No longer were the state and the protection of its territorial boundaries the primary focus behind the idea of security; rather a more comprehensive agenda of security that put people and human beings at the forefront arose. The concept of human security represents a departure from orthodox security studies that focus on the security of the state, namely, “national security.” The subjects of the human security approach are individuals and communities. Its end goal is the protection of people from traditional threats such as military violence and warfare and nontraditional threats such as poverty and disease. Moving the security agenda beyond state security does not mean replacing it but rather involves a complementary perspective.

Moving away from the realist and neorealist point of view, the 1994 United Nations Development Program’s Human Development Report (HDR) detailed a variety of security threats to...

Keywords

Security Civilians UN Critical Security Studies Poverty People 
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References

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Further Reading

  1. Acharya, A. (2001). Human security: East versus West. International Journal, 56(3), 442–460.Google Scholar
  2. Axworthy, L. (2001). Human security and global governance: Putting people first. Global Governance, 7(1), 19–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Hudson, H. (2005). ‘Doing’ security as though humans matter: A feminist perspective on gender and the politics of human security. Security Dialogue, 36(2), 155–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Tripp, A. M., Ferree, M., & Ewig, C. (Eds.). (2013). Gender, violence, and human security: Critical feminist perspectives. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ben-Gurion University of the NegevBeer-ShevaIsrael