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Undocuqueer Latinx: Counterstorytelling Narratives During and Post-High School

  • Juan A. Ríos VegaEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter analyzes the qualitative case of an undocuqueer Latinx. Drawing on critical race theory (CRT), Latino/Latina critical race (LatCrit), and queer people of color (QPOC) critique, the author explains how issues of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, and immigration status shape the experiences of Juan, a high school student at the time the study was undertaken. Additionally, this chapter discusses how the participant develops his own community cultural wealth (CCW) to challenge family and school expectations. Finally, it encourages teachers, counselors, and school administrators to advocate for undocumented and LGBTQ Latinx students to advance a social justice in education agenda.

Keyword

Homophobia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Teacher EducationBradley UniversityPeoriaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Marta Sánchez
    • 1
  1. 1.Instructional Technology, Foundations, and Secondary EducationUniversity of North Carolina WilmingtonWilmingtonUSA

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