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Language and the Internationalization of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints

  • Daniel H. OlsenEmail author
  • Samuel M. Otterstrom
Living reference work entry

Abstract

Following the New Testament admonition to “teach all nations” (Matthew 28: 19, KJV), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has an active proselytizing program to spread the good news about Jesus Christ and the restoration of his Church in modern times. Presently, over half of the membership of the Church is outside of the United States, which not only raises questions regarding the maintenance of doctrinal consistency, but also the spread of gospel ideas to non-English speakers and non-European cultural groups. The purpose of this chapter is to examine the ways in which the Church has engaged with issues related to language. In doing so, attention is given to matters pertaining to the language training of Church missionaries, the translation process of Latter-day Saint scriptures, Church materials, and General Conference talks, and the creation of language-based congregations. The ways in which the Church utilizes the Internet and social media to proselytize to non-Mormons and to control its image are also discussed.

Keywords

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Language Missionary work Translation Scriptures Ethnicity Mormons 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of GeographyBrigham Young UniversityProvoUSA

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