Climate Action

Living Edition
| Editors: Walter Leal Filho, Anabela Marisa Azul, Luciana Brandli, Pinar Gökcin Özuyar, Tony Wall

Co-benefits of Climate Change Mitigation

  • Sebastian HelgenbergerEmail author
  • Martin Jänicke
  • Konrad Gürtler
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-71063-1_93-1

Synonyms

Definition

Co-benefits

The term “Co-benefits” refers to simultaneously meeting several interests or objectives resulting from a political intervention, private sector investment or a mix thereof. Co-beneficial approaches to climate change mitigation are those that also promote positive outcomes in other areas, such as air quality and health, economic prosperity and resource efficiency (cf. Ministry of the Environment Government of Japan 2009) or more general in terms of Sustainable Development (SD) Benefit (cf. United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) 2015a).

This entry differentiates between “Opportunistic Co-benefits” which appear as auxiliary or side effect while focusing on a central objective or interest and “strategic co-benefits” which result from a deliberate effort to seizing several opportunities (e.g., economic, business, social, environmental) with a single purposeful intervention (cf....

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sebastian Helgenberger
    • 1
    Email author
  • Martin Jänicke
    • 1
  • Konrad Gürtler
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS)PotsdamGermany

Section editors and affiliations

  • Anabela Marisa Azul
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Neuroscience and Cell BiologyUniversity of CoimbraCoimbraPortugal