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Impacts of Some Climatic Factors on Soil Quality of Tropical Acid-Sand Soils

  • Nkem J. NwosuEmail author
  • Paul B. Okon
Living reference work entry

Abstract

There have been changes in yield of agricultural crops over the past decades, and these have been attributed in part to changes in environmental conditions including the soil. These changes have been induced by climatic factors of rainfall, temperature, relative humidity, and solar radiation acting singly or in combination to promote or impede beneficial soil reactions and processes. The impact of some climatic factors on soil quality of acid-sands was evaluated to assess the effect of variability in climate on soil physical and chemical properties. Annual variation in climatic factors of rainfall, air temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, and wind patterns induce seasonal changes that influences agriculture and soil quality in the tropics. Two profile pits was described prior to routine soil physical and chemical analysis. Information on the climatic conditions of the area were obtained for the past 10 years and current year. Results from soil analysis were used to deduce the soil quality using a modified version of Lal’s soil quality index (SQI). A Pearson correlation was established to ascertain the relations between soil quality and climatic variability of the area over the past decade using ORIGINPRO v.8. The results of correlation studies showed that there was no significant relationship between the soil quality and variability of climatic parameters over the study period. The result also showed that soil quality merely decreased with an r-value of −0.19 (r2 = 0.0361) as the year advanced. Therefore, the climate variability had no impact on soil quality of Calabar acid-sands.

Keywords

Soil quality Climate variability Soil quality index Correlation Sustainability 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AgronomyUniversity of IbadanIbadanNigeria
  2. 2.Department of Soil ScienceUniversity of CalabarCalabarNigeria

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