Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging

Living Edition
| Editors: Danan Gu, Matthew E. Dupre

Smart Homes

  • Matteo ZallioEmail author
  • Malcolm John Fisk
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69892-2_742-1

Synonyms

Definition

The term “smart home” has been defined in various ways. A smart home is a concept represented by a dwelling equipped with communication networks, sensors, appliances, and devices that can be remotely monitored, accessed, or controlled and which provides services that respond to specific user needs (Balta-Ozkan et al. 2014). The purpose of those services, through the use of sensors, controls, and actuators, has primarily been in the cause of monitoring and affecting security, controlling temperature, humidity, air quality, and energy usage.

Gann et al. (1999), with an eye to a broader role that would support occupants, defined smart homes as “about using the latest information and communications technology to link all the mechanical and digital devices available and create a truly interactive house.” The authors pointed to such homes as not just those that were newly built and with an aim “not to...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center for Design Research, Mechanical EngineeringStanford UniversityStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Centre for Computing and Social ResponsibilityDe Montfort University (DMU)LeicesterUK

Section editors and affiliations

  • Debbie Faulkner
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of AdelaideCentre for Housing, Urban and Regional Planning, School of Social SciencesAdelaideAustralia