Encyclopedia of Gerontology and Population Aging

Living Edition
| Editors: Danan Gu, Matthew E. Dupre

WHO’s Study on Global AGEing and Adult Health (SAGE)

  • Paul KowalEmail author
  • Nirmala Naidoo
  • Somnath Chatterji
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-69892-2_347-1

Overview

The World Health Organization’s Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) is a longitudinal study in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia, and South Africa, with nationally representative samples of persons aged 50 years and older and a smaller sample of adults aged 18–49 years in each country for comparison purposes (Kowal et al. 2012). It builds on a survey program started in WHO in 2000. The core SAGE countries provide a broad representation from different geographic regions of the world, different levels of economic development, and different stages in the demographic and health transition and include the two most populous countries of the world. With the ongoing aging of the world’s population, an increasing majority of older adults will reside in low- and middle-income countries over the next decades. This population is also undergoing dramatic transitions in the burden of disease profile, as well as in risk factors, within the context of economic development.

SAGE...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Data, Analytics and Delivery for ImpactWorld Health OrganizationGenevaSwitzerland

Section editors and affiliations

  • David Weir
    • 1
  • Mary Beth Ofstedal
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Social ResearchUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA