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Nanomaterials for Industrial Wastewater Treatment and Water Purification

  • Sukanchan PalitEmail author
Reference work entry

Abstract

Environmental engineering and chemical engineering in today’s scientific world are witnessing drastic and dramatic challenges. The challenge of technology, the vision toward zero-discharge norms, and the immense scientific rigor have urged human scientific endeavor to move toward innovative technologies. Environmental crisis and its alleviation are the utmost need of the hour. The author deeply elucidates the success of the application of nanomaterials in industrial wastewater treatment and delineates research work in the wide world of water purification. Ecomaterials are the smart materials of today and have various environmental engineering applications. The author in this treatise targets the vast and versatile domain of application of nanomaterials and ecomaterials for environmental protection. Loss of ecological biodiversity – the burning issue of ecological disbalance – and the immense potential of nanotechnology and nanomaterials are the pallbearers toward the greater emancipation of environmental engineering science in today’s world. The scientific landscape, the scientific cognizance, and the scientific vision in today’s human civilization are vast and versatile. The challenge of the application of nanotechnology to industrial wastewater treatment needs to be re-envisioned as human civilization moves from one environmental challenge over another. The author also deeply comprehends the success of application of ecomaterials in solving environmental engineering issues. Water purification is on the other side of the scientific coin. Drinking water issues, global water crisis, and the future of environmental engineering science are the precursors toward a greater vision and greater scientific understanding of water pollution issues. Ecomaterials are proposed as a key concept for materials technology that would harmonize with the environment, i.e., minimize the environmental load in a whole life. Conversion to ecomaterials is a decisive step in addressing environmental issues of resource depletion, materials recycling and reuse, global warming, and ozone depletion. The author pointedly focuses the environmental protection issues of the application of ecomaterials and nanomaterials. The vast world of application of nanomaterials in environmental engineering and environmental protection as a whole are clearly delineated in this review paper.

Keywords

Environmental Nanotechnology Nanomaterials Water Vision 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemical EngineeringUniversity of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Energy AcresDehradunIndia

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