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Regeneration and Recycling of Spent Bleaching Earth

  • Bin Mu
  • Aiqin WangEmail author
Reference work entry

Abstract

Spent bleaching earth, a solid waste from the edible oil refining industry with unpleasant odor, usually consists of clay minerals and residual oil. The residual oil can be rapidly oxidized to the point of spontaneous autoignition due to the autocatalysis action of clay minerals, so that the direct discard and landfill of spent bleaching earth result in the fire danger and environmental pollution. In order to minimize the risk of pollution, much effort has been devoted to explore the feasible approach for recycling the spent bleaching earth. Therefore, this chapter reviewed the recent research progress in regeneration and recycle of spent bleaching earth by summarizing the comprehensive literatures and our group’s latest research achievements.

Notes

Acknowledgment

This work is supported by the “863” Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology, PR China (No. 2013AA032003), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21377135 and 41601303), and the Youth Innovation Promotion Association CAS (No. 2017458).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of SciencesKey Laboratory of Clay Mineral Applied Research of Gansu Province, Center of Eco-materials and Green ChemistryLanzhouP. R. China
  2. 2.Center of Xuyi Palygorskite Applied TechnologyLanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of SciencesXuyiP. R. China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory of Clay Mineral Applied Research of Gansu Province, Center of Eco-materials and Green ChemistryLanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of SciencesLanzhouChina
  4. 4.R&D Center of Xuyi Palygorskite Applied Technology, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesXuyiChina

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