Advertisement

Dewey and Citizenship Education: Schooling as Democratic Practice

  • Piet A van der PloegEmail author
Living reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter provides a reconstruction of Dewey’s approach to citizenship education based on his books and articles written between 1885 and 1945. It is argued that Dewey’s views regarding citizenship education coincide with his views on democracy and on teaching and learning and are closely related to his general philosophy. In the chapter, extensive attention is given to the development of Dewey’s thinking on citizenship education: first through highlighting core elements of the book Democracy and Education and then through discussing relevant aspects of both his earlier work and later work. For Dewey, education and democracy are organically connected: Democracy is a condition for education and education is a condition for democracy. In schools, citizenship education cannot be distinguished as a separate subject or domain: All education contributes to democratic citizenship, provided it is inclusive and equally accessible to everyone. In addition, the chapter argues that, for Dewey, democratic education must fulfill two elementary functions: familiarizing students with their social roles and teaching them to think. Through the decades, Dewey’s focus increasingly shifts towards the importance of learning to think critically, including through investigating and understanding social structures and dynamics.

Keywords

Dewey Citizenship Democracy Critical thinking Citizenship education History of education Philosophy of education 

References

  1. Dewey, J. (1891). Outlines of a critical theory of ethics. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Early Works 1882–1898 (Vol. 3, 1889–1892, (1972)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Dewey, J. (1892). Christianity and democracy. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Early Works 1882–1898 (Vol. 4, 1893–1894, (1972), pp. 90–92). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Dewey, J. (1895). Plan and organization of the university primary school. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Early Works 1882–1898 (Vol. 5, 1895–1898, (1972), pp. 224–243). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  4. Dewey, J. (1896). The University School (of Chicago) Record 1. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Early Works 1882–1898 (Vol. 5, 1895–1898 (1972), pp. 436–441). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Dewey, J. (1897). Ethical principles underlying education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Early Works 1882–1898 (Vol. 5, 1895–1898 (1972), pp. 54–83). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  6. Dewey, J. (1899). The school and society. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 1, 1899–1901 (1976), pp. 1–109). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Dewey, J. (1916a). Democracy and education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1922 (Vol. 9, 1916 (1980)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Dewey, J. (1916b). The need of an industrial education in an industrial democracy. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 10, 1916–1917 (1980), pp. 137–143). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Dewey, J. (1916c). The schools and social preparedness. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 10, 1916–1917 (1980), pp. 191–195). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Dewey, J. (1916d). Nationalizing education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 10, 1916–1917 (1980), pp. 202–210). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Dewey, J. (1917). Learning to earn: The place of vocational education in a comprehensive scheme of public education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 10, 1916–1917 (1980), pp. 144–150). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Dewey, J. (1922a). Education as politics. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 13, 1921–1922 (1983), pp. 329–334). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Dewey, J. (1922b). Human nature and conduct. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 14 (1983)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Dewey, J. (1923a). The school as a means of developing a social consciousness and social ideals in children. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 15, 1922–1924 (1983), pp. 150–157). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Dewey, J. (1923b). Social purposes in education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 15, 1922–1924 (1983), pp. 158–169). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Dewey, J. (1927). The public and its problems. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 2, 1925–1927 (1985)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  17. Dewey, J. (1933). How we think, revised edition. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 8, 1933 (1986), pp. 105–352). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Dewey, J. (1934a). Education for a changing social order. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 9, 1933–1934 (1986), pp. 158–168). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Dewey, J. (1934b). Education and the social order. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 9, 1933–1934 (1986), pp. 175–185). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Dewey, J. (1934c). Can education share in social reconstruction? In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 9, 1933–1934 (1986), pp. 205–209). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Dewey, J. (1935a). The need for orientation. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, 1935–1937 (1987), pp. 162–166). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  22. Dewey, J. (1935b). The crucial role of intelligence. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, 1935–1937 (1987), pp. 342–344). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Dewey, J. (1937a). The challenge of democracy to education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, 1935–1937 (1987), pp. 181–190). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Dewey, J. (1937b). Education, the foundation for social organization. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, 1935–1937 (1987), pp. 226–237). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  25. Dewey, J. (1937c). Education and social change. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 11, 1935–1937 (1987), pp. 408–417). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  26. Dewey, J. (1938). Experience and education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 13, 1938–1939 (1988)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Dewey, J. (1940). Investigating education. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 14, 1939–1941 (1988), pp. 370–372). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Dewey, J., & Childs, J. L. (1933). In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 8, 1933 (1986), pp. 43–76). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  29. Dewey, J., & Tufts, J. H. (1908). Ethics. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Middle Works, 1899–1924 (Vol. 5, 1908 (1978)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Dewey, J., & Tufts, J. H. (1932). Ethics, revised edition. In J. A. Boydston (Ed.), John Dewey. The Later Works, 1925–1953 (Vol. 7, 1932 (1985)). Carbondale/Edwardsville: Southern Illinois University Press.Google Scholar
  31. Van der Ploeg, P. A. (2013). Dalton Plan: Origins and Theory of Dalton Education. Deventer: Saxion Dalton University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of GroningenGroningenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations