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The Investigation and Prosecution of Traffickers: Challenges and Opportunities

  • Rosemary BroadEmail author
  • Julia Muraszkiewicz
Living reference work entry

Abstract

This chapter will draw on the literature, policy, and research to consider the processes of investigating and prosecuting human trafficking activities across three jurisdictions. The chapter will be split into the following three sections:
  1. 1.

    The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime Toolkit to combat human trafficking and themes from the UN regarding approaches to perpetrators

     
  2. 2.

    International initiatives that have developed including those within the European Union, Canada, and the United States

     
  3. 3.

    A case study of investigation and prosecution in the United Kingdom

     

These sections are drawn together by identifying learning through the development of best practice along with the challenges that exist in the investigation and prosecution of human trafficking offences.

Keywords

Human trafficking Prosecution Modern slavery Investigation 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of ManchesterManchesterUK
  2. 2.Trilateral Research LtdLondonUK

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