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Hazardous Waste Management

  • Shweta Kailash Pal
  • M. Saravanan
  • S. Subhashini
  • Kantha Deivi ArunachalamEmail author
Living reference work entry
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Abstract

Hazardous wastes refer to wastes that may or tend to cause adverse health effects on the ecosystem and human beings. These wastes are biologically magnified, non-degradable, and highly toxic and cause the potential risks to living organisms even at low concentrations. Characteristics and its quantity of hazardous wastes determine the threat to the environment. Government agencies provided the list and characteristics like reactivity, corrosivity, and ignitibility; toxicity declares the waste is hazardous. It includes radioactive substances, chemicals, biomedical wastes, explosives, flammable wastes, and household hazardous wastes. Storage and transport, transfer and transport, and processing and disposal are the various elements of hazardous waste management. Physical, chemical, thermal, and biological treatments are used for hazardous waste treatment. Waste minimization is the reduction of hazardous wastes that is a generation before treatment processes. Control in pollution-causing techniques and the recycling wastes are entertained for the waste minimization.

Keywords

Toxic Non-degradable-radioactive and biomedical wastes Physical, chemical, thermal, and biological treatments Pollution control 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shweta Kailash Pal
    • 1
  • M. Saravanan
    • 1
  • S. Subhashini
    • 1
  • Kantha Deivi Arunachalam
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Biotechnology, School of BioengineeringSRM Institute of Science and TechnologyKattankulathur, ChennaiIndia
  2. 2.Center for Environmental Nuclear ResearchSRM Institute of Science and TechnologyKattankulathur, ChennaiIndia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Chaudhery Mustansar Hussain
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Environmental ScienceNew Jersey Institute of TechnologyNewarkUSA

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