Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

  • Lyn S. TurkstraEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_933

Short Description

Transcortical sensory aphasia is a subtype of fluent aphasia in which repetition is preserved and auditory comprehension and verbal expression are impaired. Extemporaneous speech is fluent and effortless, with intact grammar and prosody and frequent paraphasic errors.

Categorization

Transcortical sensory aphasia is a subtype of fluent aphasia, differentiated from other fluent aphasia types by the patient’s preserved ability to repeat words and phrases, relative to their impaired comprehension and paraphasic output.

Natural History, Prognostic Factors, and Outcomes

Transcortical aphasias are relatively rare, occurring in less than 10% of patients with stroke (Bakheit et al. 2007; Laska et al. 2001). When a patient presents with transcortical aphasia after stroke, recovery tends to be rapid. For nonvascular disorders, the prognosis depends on the etiology as well as predictors of outcome in general, such as comorbid conditions, age, and lesion size.

Neuropsychology and...

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References and Reading

  1. Bakheit, A. M. O., Shaw, S., Carrington, S., & Griffiths, S. (2007). The rate and extent of improvement with therapy from the different types of aphasia in the first year after stroke. Clinical Rehabilitation, 21, 941–949.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
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  3. Damasio, H. (2001). Neural basis of language disorders. In R. Chapey (Ed.), Language intervention strategies in aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders (4th ed.). Philadelphia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.Google Scholar
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  5. Goodglass, H., Kaplan, E., & Barresi, B. (2000). Boston diagnostic aphasia examination (3rd ed.). San Antonio: The Psychological Corporation.Google Scholar
  6. Kwon, M., Shim, W. H., Kim, S. J., & Kim, J. S. (2017). Transcortical sensory aphasia after left frontal lobe infarction: Loss of functional connectivity. European Neurology, 78(1–2), 15–21.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  7. Laska, A. C., Hellblom, A., Murray, V., Kahan, T., & Von Arbin, M. (2001). Aphasia in acute stroke and relation to outcome. Journal of Internal Medicine, 249, 413–422.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Rehabilitation ScienceMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada