Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

PCL-C

  • Marc A. SilvaEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_9235

Synonyms

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist

Description

The PTSD Checklist (PCL) is a self-report questionnaire that measures symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). The PCL was first developed during the 1990s by Frank Weathers and colleagues at the National Center for PTSD (Weathers et al. 1993) and recently revised. The current version (PCL-5; Blevins et al. 2015; Weathers et al. 2013b) is a 20-item questionnaire with items corresponding to the 20 PTSD symptoms (Criteria B-E) in the DSM-5 (American Psychiatric Association 2013). Items 1–5 reflect intrusive reexperiencing symptoms (Criteria B), items 6–7 reflect avoidance symptoms (Criteria C), items 8–14 reflect negative mood and cognition symptoms (Criteria D), and items 15–20 reflect hyperarousal symptoms (Criteria E) (Blevins et al. 2015). Respondents rate the degree to which each symptom has bothered them within past month on a 5-point...

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References and Readings

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  11. Weathers, F. W., & Ford, J. (1996). Psychometric review of PTSD Checklist (PCL-C, PCL-S, PCL-M, PCL-PR). In B. H. Stamm (Ed.), Measurement of stress, trauma, and adaptation (pp. 250–251). Lutherville: Sidran Press.Google Scholar
  12. Weathers, F. W., Litz, B. T., Herman, D. S., Huska, J. A., & Keane, T. M. (1993). The PTSD Checklist (PCL): Reliability, validity, and diagnostic utility. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies, San Antonio.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG (outside the USA) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences ServiceJames A. Haley Veterans’ HospitalTampaUSA