Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Grapheme

  • Angel BallEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_891

Definition

A grapheme is a representation of a letter concept in a language. Each grapheme may have different graphs that are linguistically an agreed-upon letter, i.e., <a, a, a>. Graphs vary by font or handwriting style, but users of a language agree that certain graphs are still of the same grapheme. The appearances of the graphs can be considered allographs of the same grapheme. The graphemic buffer is part of the cognitive-linguistic processes in which there is a connection between the phoneme(s) and the grapheme(s) in both reading and writing, e.g., (/ʃυ/in spoken form = <shoe> in written form).

See Also

References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Clinical Health SciencesTexas A&M University – KingsvilleKingsvilleUSA