Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Aphasia

  • Janet P. PattersonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_858

Short Description or Definition

“Aphasia is an acquired communication disorder caused by brain damage, characterized by impairments of language modalities; speaking, listening, reading and writing; it is not the result of a sensory or motor deficit, a general intellectual deficit, confusion or a psychiatric disorder” (Hallowell and Chapey 2008, p. 3). Aphasia is typically acquired suddenly as a result of a stroke or traumatic brain injury but can appear more slowly accompanying other neurological events such as tumor or disease. When aphasia develops slowly over time and is the only behavioral symptom present, the diagnosis is primary progressive aphasia (PPA). Aphasia is often classified according to the appearance of a constellation of behavioral symptoms including impairment in auditory comprehension, reading comprehension, naming, production of grammatically correct sentences, repetition, writing, and presence of paraphasic (substitution) sound or word errors (e.g., saying table...

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG (outside the USA) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology ServiceVA Northern California Health Care SystemMartinezUSA