Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Liepmann, Hugo Karl (1863–1925)

  • Michelle Ann ProsjeEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_634

Major Appointments

  • Assistant to Wernicke (Breslau, Germany, 1895–1899)

  • Municipal Welfare for the Mentally Ill in Berlin

  • Assistant and Consultant for Psychiatric Hospital of Dalldorf

  • Director of Psychiatric Hospital in Herzberge (1914–1920)

  • Private Lecturer (University of Berlin, 1901–1905)

  • Professor (University of Berlin, 1905–1919)

  • Honorary Professor and Secret Medical Counselor (University of Berlin, 1919)

Major Honors and Awards

  • President of the Berlin Society for Psychiatry and Nervous Diseases (1912–1916)

Landmark Clinical, Scientific, and Professional Contributions

  • The German neurologist and psychiatrist Hugo Karl Liepmann is best known for his work on apraxia. Although John Hughlings Jackson was the first to clearly define the syndrome of apraxia in 1861, he did not fully elucidate the concept. Liepmann coined the term “apraxia,” delineated associational cortical areas, and distinguished among three types of apraxia: (1) limb-kinetic (melokinetic), (2) ideomotor, and (3)...

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References and Readings

  1. Goldenberg, G. (2003). Apraxia and beyond: Life and work of Hugo Liepmann. Cortex, 39, 509–524.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Heilman, K. M., Watson, R. T., & Rothi, L. J. G. (2003). Disorders of skilled movements: Limb apraxia. In T. E. Feinbert & M. J. Farah (Eds.), Behavioral neurology and neuropsychology (pp. 217–224). New York: McGraw-Hill.Google Scholar
  3. Lammel, I. (1993). Judisches leben in Pankow. Berlin: Edition Hentrich.Google Scholar
  4. Liepmann, H. (1900). Das Krankheitsbild der Apraxie (Motorische Asymbolie). Monatscrhift fur Psychiatrie und Neurologie, 8, 15-44. Translated in 1977 as the syndrome of apraxia (motor asymboly) based on a case of unilateral apraxia. In D. A. Rottenberg & F. H. Hochberg (Eds.), Neurological classics in modern translation (pp. 155–181). New York: Hafner Press.Google Scholar
  5. Liepmann, H. (1905). The left hemisphere and action. Republished in 1908 in Drei Aufsatze aus dem Apraxiegebiet. Berlin: Karger. (trans: Kimura, D. (1980). Translations from Liepmann’s essays on apraxia (Research Bullet No. 506)). London: Department of Psychology, University of Western Ontario.Google Scholar
  6. Liepmann, H. (1977). The syndrome of apraxia (motor asymboly) based on a case of unilateral apraxia. In D. A. Rottenberg & F. H. Hochberg (Eds.), Neurological classics in modern translation (pp. 155–181). New York: Hafner Press.Google Scholar
  7. Liepmann, H. (1988). Apraxia. In J. W. Brown (Ed.), Agnosia and apraxia: Selected papers of Liepmann, Lange, and Potzl (pp. 3–39). Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.Google Scholar
  8. Liepmann, K., & Hamburger-Liepmann, C. (1977). Epilogue. In D. A. Rottenberg & F. H. Hochberg (Eds.), Neurological classics in modern translation (pp. 181–183). New York: Hafner Press.Google Scholar
  9. Rothi, L. J. G., Heilman, K. M. (1996). Liepmann (1900 and 1905): A definition of apraxia and a model of praxis. C. Code, C-W. Wallesch, A. R. Lecours Classic cases in neuropsychology. East Sussex: Psychology Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.NeuroBehavioral Specialists of Jacksonville, Inc.JacksonvilleUSA