Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

  • Kathleen L. FuchsEmail author
  • John DeLuca
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_520

Synonyms

Chronic progressive multiple sclerosis

Definition

As the name implies, primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS) is marked by continuous accumulation of neurological deficits from the onset with no recovery to baseline functioning (see Fig. 1). There may be periods of relative stability in the course or plateaus in symptom severity (see Fig. 2). A minority of those diagnosed with PPMS experience a mild relapse at some point, but this does not alter the disease course (Kremenchutzky et al. 1999).
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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of NeurologyUniversity of Virginia Health SystemCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.Research DepartmentKessler FoundationWest OrangeUSA