Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Assessment of Motor Process Skills

  • Kelli Williams GaryEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1794

Synonyms

AMPS

Description

The Assessment of Motor Process Skills (AMPS) is a standardized observational assessment widely used by occupational therapists to measure the quality of performance in activities of daily living (ADL) of persons across the age spectrum beginning at 2 years. Specifically, the AMPS tests functions that relate to purposeful, goal-oriented daily life tasks that a person wants, needs, and is expected to perform; it does not evaluate neuromuscular, biomechanical, cognitive, and psychosocial impairments (Fisher and Jones 2011). The current version of the assessment contains 110 calibrated ADL tasks that permit evaluation of 36 skills (16 motor, 20 process); AMPS-trained raters must observe two or more specific tasks in 10–20 min increments.

A multi-perspective approach is used to rate each task by observing various motor and process skills in terms of physical effort, efficiency, safety, and independence. The 16 motor skills reflect ability to use body positions,...

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References and Readings

  1. Doble, S. E., Fisk, J. D., Lewis, N., & Rockwood, K. (1999). Test-retest reliability of the assessment of motor and process skills. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 19, 203–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Fisher, A. G. (2006). Assessment of motor and process skills. Vol. 1: Development, standardization, and administration manual (6th ed.). Fort Collins: Three Star Press.Google Scholar
  3. Fisher, A. G., & Bernspång, B. (2007). Response to: A critique of the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) in mental health practice. Mental Health Occupational Therapy, 12, 10–11.Google Scholar
  4. Fisher, A. G., & Jones, B. J. (2011). The assessment of motor and process skills (AMPS) (7th ed., rev., Vols. 1 & 2). Fort Collins: Three Star Press.Google Scholar
  5. Hitch, D. (2007). A reply from Danielle Hitch to the Fisher and Bernspång response to: A critique of the assessment of motor and process skills (AMPS) in mental health practice. Mental Health Occupational Therapy, 12, 14.Google Scholar
  6. Stauffer, L. M., Fisher, A. G., & Duran, L. (2000). ADL performance of black Americans and white Americans on the assessment of motor and process skills. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 54, 607–613.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Wæhrens, E. E., & Fisher, A. G. (2007). Improving quality of ADL performance after rehabilitation among persons with acquired brain injury. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 14, 250–257.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Occupational TherapyVirginia Commonwealth UniversityRichmondUSA