Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique

  • Angela M. Philippus
  • Gale G. WhiteneckEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1789

Synonyms

CHART; CHART-SF

Description

The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART) is a 32-item instrument designed to provide a simple, objective measure of the degree to which impairments and disabilities result in handicaps (societal participation limitations) for adolescents and adults (15 years and older) in the years after initial rehabilitation. The CHART includes six subscales (physical independence, cognitive independence, mobility, occupation, social integration, and economic independence), which closely reflect the disablement model developed by the World Health Organization (WHO 1980, 2001). Each subscale contains 3–7 questions, which together quantify the extent to which individuals fulfill various social roles. CHART focuses on objective, observable criteria that are easily quantifiable and unlikely to be open to subjective interpretation. Each of the domains or subscales of the CHART has a maximum score of 100 points, which is considered to be the level...

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Craig HospitalEnglewoodUSA