Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Human Figure Drawing Tests

  • Carter M. CunninghamEmail author
  • Ida Sue Baron
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1552

Synonyms

Draw-A-Person Intellectual Ability Test for Children, Adolescents, and Adults (DAP:IQ); Draw-A-Person Test (DAP); Draw-A-Person: A Quantitative Scoring System (DAP:QSS); Draw-A-Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbances (DAP:SPED); Goodenough-Harris Drawing Test (GHDT); HFD

Description

The human figure drawing test has evolved over many years of clinical use. The original Draw-A-Man Test (DAMT) was created by Florence Goodenough and later modified by Dale B. Harris; it was used to evaluate children’s intelligence. Administration time is about 10–15 min for those aged 3–15 years. The subject is provided paper and pencil and one of a number of test instructions, for example, “draw a whole figure, not a stick figure,” or provided three sheets of paper and asked to “draw a man, a woman, and yourself.” For the latter version, drawings are scored on 73 dimensions that evaluate different figural aspects, including body parts, motor coordination, and face and limb...

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References and Readings

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fairfax Neonatal AssociatesFalls ChurchUSA
  2. 2.PotomacUSA