Encyclopedia of Clinical Neuropsychology

2018 Edition
| Editors: Jeffrey S. Kreutzer, John DeLuca, Bruce Caplan

Test of Everyday Attention

  • Allison S. EvansEmail author
  • Andrew Preston
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57111-9_1298

Synonyms

TEA

Description

The Test of Everyday Attention (TEA) is a standardized and normed clinical battery for adults (18 years plus) that allows for comparison across different attentional capacities.

Historical Background

TEA (Robertson et al. 1996) is a standardized and normed clinical battery for adults that allows for comparison across different attentional capacities. It was developed to measure different domains of attention and was based on (a) theories of attention, (b) findings from neuroimaging and lesion studies of attention, and (c) an awareness of the limitations of existing neuropsychological measures when predicting attentional functioning in everyday life. The authors and other researchers have argued that the TEA was developed as a theoretically based and ecologically valid assessment that was able to better examine the different domains of attention. The TEA was based on Posner and Peterson’s (1990) model of attention and includes subtests designed to assess the...

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References and Readings

  1. Hayden, M. E., & Hart, T. (1986). Rehabilitation of cognitive and behavioral dysfunction in head injury. Advances in Psychosomatic Medicine, 16, 194–229.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Posner, M. I., & Peterson, S. E. (1990). The attention system of the human brain. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 13, 25–42.PubMedCentralCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Robertson, J. H., Ward, A., Ridgeway, V., & Nimmo-Smith, I. (1996). Test of everyday attention. Journal of the International Neurological Society, 2, 525–534.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Concord Comprehensive Neuropsychological ServicesConcordUSA
  2. 2.Department of PediatricsChapel Hill Pediatric PsychologyChapel HillUSA