Island Southeast Asia: Neolithic

  • David BulbeckEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_866-2

Introduction

Island South East Asia (ISEA) comprises the tropical islands lying in between Mainland Southeast Asia (MSEA) and Taiwan to the northwest and Australia and New Guinea to the southeast. The western islands lie on a shallow continental shelf, the Sunda Shelf, and were connected to MSEA during the Pleistocene. The eastern islands that have been separated from the mainland and from each other by deep marine troughs include the Philippines (east of Palawan), Sulawesi, northern Moluccas, and the Nusa Tenggara (“southeast”) islands. Accordingly, colonization of eastern ISEA by anatomically modern humans (AMH), leading to the colonization of Australia and New Guinea by 50,000 years ago, would have required watercraft capable of transporting groups of people numerous enough to establish viable daughter colonies. By 5,000 years ago, on the eve of the Neolithic, all of the large islands and many of the small islands of ISEA were settled by foragers whose most consistent archaeological...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Archaeology and Natural HistoryThe Australian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

Section editors and affiliations

  • Marcel Otte
    • 1
  1. 1.Université de Liège, PréhistoireLiègeBelgium