Archaeology of Mining

  • Linda R. GosnerEmail author
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-51726-1_2716-1

Introduction

The extraction and processing of metals and other minerals have played a significant role in economic, political, and social developments across the globe from early in prehistory to the present day. Processes of mining and metallurgy have left a number of material traces in the archaeological record, from mines themselves, to metallurgical slag and other waste, to finished metal objects, and to traces of environmental pollution. Likewise, mining landscapes often preserve other features related to mining labor and the economy, including settlements for housing laborers as well as roads and railroads for shipping. As such, mining has been examined from a variety of different archaeological perspectives and methods. The archaeology of mining, while in no way a cohesive subdiscipline, plays an important role in industrial archaeology and archaeometallurgy; in period-specific subfields including historical archaeology, prehistory, and classical archaeology; as well as in...

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Further Reading

  1. Conlin Casella, Eleanor, and James Sumonds, eds. 2005. Industrial archaeology: Future directions. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  2. Knapp, A. Bernard, Vincent C. Piggott, and Eugenia W. Herbert, eds. 1998. Social approaches to an industrial past: The archaeology and anthropology of mining. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Roberts, Benjamin W., and Christopher P. Thornton, eds. 2014. Archaeometallurgy in global perspective: Methods and syntheses. London: Springer.Google Scholar
  4. White, Paul J. 2016. The archaeology of underground mining landscapes. Historical Archaeology 50 (1): 154–168.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. White, Paul J. 2017. The archaeology of American mining. Gainesville: University Press of Florida.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Classical Studies, Society of FellowsUniversity of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Richard McClary
  • Douglas C. Comer
    • 1
  1. 1.ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Archaeological Heritage Management (ICAHM)Cultural Site Research and Management, Inc. (CSRM)BaltimoreUSA