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Global Consequences of the Microbial Production and Consumption of Inorganic and Organic Sulfur Compounds

  • Donovan P. KellyEmail author
  • Ann P. Wood
Reference work entry
Part of the Handbook of Hydrocarbon and Lipid Microbiology book series (HHLM)

Abstract

This chapter is a very brief outline of the consequences of the activities of microorganisms such as (1) the sulfate-reducing and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, (2) bacteria able to metabolize the complex organosulfur compounds found in oil and coal, (3) the organisms that produce dimethylsulfide in the oceans, and (4) the effects that the activities of these organisms may have on the Earth over geological and human timescales. It is a short overview that aims to provide links into the huge literature on all of these topics.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Life SciencesUniversity of WarwickCoventryUK
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryKing’s College LondonLondonUK

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