Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Matrix and Arrows in Integrative Systemic Therapy

  • William M. PinsofEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_918

Introduction

The interrelated concepts of the Matrix and the Arrows in Integrative Problem Centered Therapy – IPCT (Pinsof 1983, 1995) and more recently in Integrative Systemic Therapy –IST (Pinsof et al. 2017) serve to organize the structural (matrix) and dynamic (arrow) relationships between therapeutic models and modalities in integrative psychotherapy. After defining and differentiating therapeutic models and modalities, this entry describes and explains the matrix and the arrows.

Psychotherapeutic Models and Modalities

A therapeutic model is characterized by a theory of problem formation or maintenance and a theory of problem resolution. For instance, in terms of problem maintenance, object relations theory asserts that people have problems because they maladaptively transfer their disordered object relations from childhood to their current “attached” relationships. In terms of problem resolution, the client’s internalized map of interpersonal relationships needs to be understood...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Pinsof Family Systems, LLCChicagoUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Douglas C. Breunlin
    • 1
  1. 1.The Family InstituteNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA