Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Greenberg, Leslie

  • Rhonda N. GoldmanEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_794

Name

Greenberg, Leslie

Introduction

In his academic career, Leslie Greenberg has led the development of two innovative, research-supported psychotherapy approaches – emotion-focused therapies (EFT) for individuals and couples. Both approaches have been significantly developed with both theory and research over the past 30 years. This entry will focus on Greenberg’s development of the emotion-focused couples approach.

Career

Leslie Greenberg was born and raised in Johannesburg, South Africa. He moved to Canada with his wife Brenda in 1965 and first completed a master’s in systems engineering at McMaster University in Hamilton. He went on to complete a PhD in Clinical Psychology at York University under the tutelage of Laura Rice, a former student of Carl Rogers. It was his early humanistic and experiential training that solidified his belief in the power of the therapeutic relationship characterized by empathy, genuineness, and unconditional positive regard to effect change, along with...

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References

  1. Goldman, R. N., & Greenberg, L. (2013). Working with identity and self-soothing in emotion-focused therapy for couples. Family Process, 52, 62–82.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Greenberg, L. S., & Johnson, S. M. (1988). Emotionally focused therapy for couples. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  3. Greenberg, L. S., & Goldman, R. (2008). Emotion-focused couples therapy: The dynamics of emotion, love and power. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Greenberg, L. S., Rice, L. N., & Elliott, R. (1993). Facilitating emotional change. New York: Guilford Publishers.Google Scholar
  5. Greenberg, L. S., Warwar, S., & Malcolm, W. (2010). Emotion-focused couples therapy and the facilitation of forgiveness. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 36(1), 28–42.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  6. McKinnon, J. M., & Greenberg, L. S. (2013). Revealing underlying vulnerable emotion in couple therapy: Impact on session and final outcome. Journal of Family Therapy, 35, 303–319.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Woldarsky Meneses, C., & Greenberg, L. S. (2014). Interpersonal forgiveness in emotion-focused couples’ therapy: Relating process to outcome. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 40(1), 49–67.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Argosy UniversityChicagoUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Kelley Quirk
    • 1
  • Adam Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Development and Family StudiesColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA