Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Hardy, Kenneth V.

  • Kiran AroraEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_780

Introduction

Kenneth V. Hardy is an internationally acclaimed scholar, trainer, and clinician in the field of family therapy. He has published widely in the areas of social justice, race, trauma, and oppression. In addition to numerous journal articles, he has authored three books and eight training videos. His work has been featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, 20/20, Dateline NBC, PBS, and the Discovery Health Channel. He is an organizational consultant to several institutions including the Department of Public Health in San Francisco where he conducts racial humility training designed to assist departments in addressing health disparities. Hardy is the director of the Eikenberg Institute for Relationships in New York City.

Career

Hardy received his Ph.D. in Marriage and Family Therapy from Florida State University and completed his postdoctoral training at the Mental Research Institute and Family Therapy Institute of Washington D.C. He is the former Director of the Center for...

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References

  1. Hardy, K. V. (2008a). Race, reality, and relationships: Implications for the re-visioning of family therapy. In M. McGoldrick & K. V. Hardy (Eds.), Re-visioning family therapy: Race, culture, and gender in clinical practice (2nd ed., pp. 76–84). New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  2. Hardy, K. V. (2008b). On becoming a GEMM therapist: Work harder, be smarter, and never discuss race. In M. McGoldrick & K. V. Hardy (Eds.), Re-visioning family therapy: Race, culture, and gender in clinical practice (2nd ed., pp. 461–468). New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  3. Hardy, K.V. (2015a, November/ December). The view from black America: Uncovering untold stories. Psychotherapy Networker.Google Scholar
  4. Hardy, K.V. (2015b). Uncovering the invisible wounds of socio-cultural trauma in working with oppressed children and families. Context, Issue number 137.Google Scholar
  5. Hardy, K. V., & Bobes, T. (Eds.). (2016). Culturally sensitive supervision and training: Diverse perspectives and practical applications. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  6. Hardy, K. V., & Laszloffy, T. A. (2002). Couple therapy using a multicultural perspective. In A. S. Gurman & N. S. Jacobson (Eds.), Clinical handbook of couple therapy (3rd ed., pp. 569–593). New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  7. Hardy, K. V., & Laszloffy, T. A. (2005). Teens who hurt: Clinical interventions for breaking the cycle of adolescent violence. New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  8. Hardy, K. V., & Laszloffy, T. A. (2008). The dynamics of a pro-racist ideology: Implications for family therapists. In M. McGoldrick & K. V. Hardy (Eds.), Re-visioning family therapy: Race, culture, and gender in clinical practice (2nd ed., pp. 225–237). New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Long Island UniversityBrooklynUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mudita Rastogi
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Argosy UniversitySchaumburgUSA