Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Miklowitz, David

  • Sara VicendeseEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_712

Name

David J. Miklowitz, Ph.D. (7/18/57–Present)

Introduction

David Miklowitz is a world-renowned researcher and clinician who has devoted his career to exploring environmental and psychosocial risk factors within families affected by bipolar disorder, developing treatments to address these risk factors, and investigating the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions for youth with or at risk for bipolar disorder or psychosis. He has published more than 250 research articles and 8 books, including the international bestseller The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide.

Career

Miklowitz began his career as an undergraduate student and research associate at Brandeis University (BA, 1979). He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles (1979–1985), where he also completed an NIMH-funded postdoctoral fellowship (1985–1988). Between 1989 and 2009, he was a faculty member in psychology at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Since 2009, he has been a Professor of Psychiatry...

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References

  1. Miklowitz, D. J. (2010). Bipolar disorder: A family-focused treatment approach (2nd ed., revised). New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  2. Miklowitz, D. J. (2011). The bipolar disorder survival guide (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Publications.Google Scholar
  3. Miklowitz, D. J., & Chung, B. (2016). Family-focused treatment for bipolar disorder: Reflections on 30 years of research. Family Process.  https://doi.org/10.1111/famp.12237. [Epub ahead of print].
  4. Miklowitz, D. J., George, E. L., Richards, J. A., Simoneau, T. L., & Suddath, R. L. (2003). A randomized study of family-focused psychoeducation and pharmacotherapy in the outpatient management of bipolar disorder. Archives of General Psychiatry, 60, 904–912.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  5. Miklowitz, D. J., Otto, M. W., Frank, E., Reilly-Harrington, N. A., Wisniewski, S. R., Kogan, J. N., Nierenberg, A. A., Calabrese, J. R., Marangell, L. B., Gyulai, L., Araga, M., Gonzalez, J. M., Shirley, E. R., Thase, M. E., & Sachs, G. S. (2007). Psychosocial treatments for bipolar depression: A 1-year randomized trial from the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program. Archives of General Psychiatry, 64, 419–427.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Miklowitz, D. J., Axelson, D. A., Birmaher, B., George, E. L., Taylor, D. O., Schneck, C. D., Beresford, C. A., Dickinson, L. M., Craighead, W. E., & Brent, D. A. (2008). Family-focused treatment for adolescents with bipolar disorder: Results of a 2-year randomized trial. Archives of General Psychiatry, 65(9), 1053–1061.PubMedPubMedCentralCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.LMFTLos AngelesUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Corinne Datchi
    • 1
  • Ryan M. Earl
    • 2
  1. 1.Seton Hall UniversitySouth OrangeUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA