Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Training Clinical Psychologists in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Mark StantonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_656

Name of Concept

Training clinical psychologists in couple and family therapy

Synonyms

Doctoral psychology education in Couple and Family Therapy

Introduction

Training in couple and family therapy (CFT) extends the broad and general education received by all psychologists in APA-approved programs to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to provide competent and ethical professional specialty services to couples and families (Stanton and Harway 2017). It is a response to public demand for practitioners who provide services for couple and family issues and the ethical responsibility for psychologists to practice within the scope of their education, training, and experience (Patterson 2009).

Contemporary training in CFT is centered on the development of competencies for specialty practice (Stanton and Welsh 2011). In many cases, these competencies are founded on general competencies in psychology, but they are extended or enhanced to meet the particular challenges and...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Thorana Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah State UniversitySanta FeUSA