Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Supervising Ethical Issues in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Tamara G. SherEmail author
  • Mike Niznikiewicz
  • Wenting Mu
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_644

Introduction

Supervision of couple and family therapy cases is as different from supervision of individual cases as couple/family therapy is different from individual therapy. The couple or family adds levels of complexity in each case. As a result, ethical dilemmas are also different and more complicated. There are two ways to approach the topic of “ethical issues in couple and family therapy”: (a) addressing the ethical issues that arise from delivering couple/family therapy within supervision and (b) addressing the ethical issues that arise within the supervision relationship when discussing couple/family cases.

Theoretical Context

The theoretical context for this entry is primarily rooted in the cognitive-behavioral orientation of providing therapy and supervision.

Description

Although treatment and supervision decisions in both individual therapy and couple/family therapy are guided by the code of ethics outlined by the American Psychological Association (2010), the ethics code...

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References

  1. American Psychological Association. (2010). American Psychological Association ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct. Retrieved June 2016, from http://www.apa.org/ethics/code/principles.pdf
  2. Bray, J. H., Shepherd, J. N., & Hays, J. R. (1985). Legal and ethical issues in informed consent to psychotherapy. The American Journal of Family Therapy, 13(2), 50–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Margolin, G. (1982). Ethical and legal considerations in martial and family therapy. American Psychologist, 37(7), 788–801.PubMedCrossRefPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tamara G. Sher
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mike Niznikiewicz
    • 2
  • Wenting Mu
    • 2
  1. 1.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA
  2. 2.University of Illinois, Urbana ChampaignChampaignUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Thorana Nelson
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah State UniversitySanta FeUSA