Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Society for Couple and Family Psychology, American Psychological Association

  • Mark StantonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_610

Name of Organization or Institution

Society for Couple and Family Psychology, American Psychological Association

Synonyms

Division 43, American Psychological Association; SCFP

Introduction

The Society for Couple and Family Psychology (SCFP) is the primary home within the American Psychological Association for psychologists who adhere to a systemic theoretical perspective and provide psychological services and/or conduct research with couples and families. SCFP is Division 43 of the American Psychological Association (APA). It was founded in 1984 as an outgrowth of the widespread interest in couple and family dynamics that emerged after World War II and led to theoretical frameworks and innovative treatments before it was institutionalized into organizations in the 1960–1990 eras (Goldenberg et al. 2017). One early organization was the Academy of Psychologists in Marriage Counseling, formed in 1959 at the APA annual convention. This group promoted the science and professional practice...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Azusa Pacific UniversityAzusaUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Kelley Quirk
    • 1
  • Adam Fisher
    • 2
  1. 1.Human Development and Family StudiesColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA