Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Family Therapy

  • Cindy CarlsonEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_594

Name

Family Therapy

Synonyms

Family counseling; Family intervention

Introduction

Family therapy has been defined as, “a psychotherapeutic approach that focuses on altering interactions between a couple, with a nuclear or extended family, or between a family and other interpersonal systems, with the goal of alleviating problems initially presented by individual family members, family subsystems, the family as a whole, or other referral sources.” (Wynne 1988, p. 9). Central to the definition of family therapy is a focus on changing relationships and social interactions as a means to treating human problems (Doherty and McDaniel 2010). Family therapy rests on the premise that the family, as an interlocking set of relationships with repeated social interactions over time, is influential in the development and maintenance of individual problems. Family therapy may be differentiated from other psychotherapies by its emphasis on the system of interlocking relationships as a wholein...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Rachel M. Diamond
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Saint JosephWest HartfordUSA