Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Play in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Eliana GilEmail author
  • David A. Crenshaw
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_546

Introduction

There are several comprehensive historical reviews of family play therapy (Sori and Gil 2015; Miller 1994) that document consistent efforts to promote an integration of play and family therapy approaches. Several family therapists (Zilbach 1986, 1995; Keith and Whitaker 1981; Irwin and Malloy 1975) and play therapists (Gil 1994, 2015; Schaefer and Carey 1994; Sori and Sprenkle 2004) have highlighted family play therapy with minimal impact. Although both groups maintain a passing interest in integration, neither group has made a wholehearted or spirited embrace of the other and some have speculated as to myriad reasons for this (Green 1994).

In spite of an apparent hesitancy from both camps, the authors believe that a play therapy approach can be easily and successfully integrated with a systemic/contextual framework. Family therapists value the participation of all family members and prioritize interventions that are inclusive, denying the singular role of an “identified...

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References

  1. Booth, P., & Jernberg, A. (2009). Theraplay: Helping parents & children build a better relationship through attachment-based play. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gil Institute for Trauma Recovery and EducationFairfaxUSA
  2. 2.Children’s Home of PoughkeepsiePoughkeepsieUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sean Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International UniversitySacramentoUSA