Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Personality in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Jeffrey J. MagnavitaEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_545

Introduction and Generic Concepts

We are fascinated with other people and ourselves, wondering why we behave in certain predictable and unpredictable ways. We are curious about our similarities and unique differences. What attracts us to our mates? What makes some relationships stand the test of time and others falter and dissolve? Why do children from the same family often show dramatic variations in behavior and characteristics? Who we are – how we think, feel, perceive the world, relate to others, make meaning out of the world, and our identity – are all components of our personality. The concept of personality has been central to the science of psychology, as well as fundamental to the practice of psychotherapy. Humankind’s interest in personality likely began not far from our inception and development of consciousness and has evolved over thousands of years. Over the past century and half, our understanding of personality and disorders of personality has advanced dramatically. We...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.GlastonburyUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Sean D. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.California School of Professional PsychologyAlliant International UniversitySacramentoUSA