Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Ethnicity in Couples and Families

  • Nydia Garcia PretoEmail author
  • Monica McGoldrick
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_475

Synonyms

Cultural identity

Introduction

Ethnicity, the concept of a group’s “peoplehood,” refers to a group’s common ancestry and history, through which people have evolved shared values and customs over the centuries. Based on a combination of race, religion, geography, political, and cultural history, ethnicity is retained, whether or not members realize their commonalities with one another. Its values are transmitted over generations by the family and reinforced by the surrounding community. Ethnicity is a powerful influence in determining identity. It patterns our thinking, feeling, and behavior in both obvious and subtle ways, although generally we are not aware of it. It plays a major role in determining how we eat, work, celebrate, make love, and die (McGoldrick et al. 2005).

Ethnicity is not, however, the only dimension of culture, and to understand it, we must pay attention to its intersection with race, social class, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion, geography,...

This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access.

References

  1. Abudabbeh, N. (2005). Arab families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  2. Bernal, G., & Saez-Santiago, E. (2006). Cultural centered psychosocial interventions. Community Psychology, 34, 121–132.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bernal, G., & Scharron-del-Rio, M. R. (2001). Are empirically supported treatments valid for ethnic minorities? Toward an alternative approach for treatment research. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Journal, 7(4), 328–342.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Brice-Baker, J. (2005). British West Indian families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  5. Brusma, L. D., & Porow, M. (2016). Multiracial families: Issues in families and children. In S. Kelly & B. N. Hudson (Eds.), Diversity in couple and family therapy: Ethnicities, sexualities, and socioeconomics. Santa Barbara: Praeger.Google Scholar
  6. Busby, D. M., & Holman, T. B. (2009). Perceived match or mismatch on the Gottman conflict Styles: Associations with relationship outcome variables. Family Process, 48(4), 531–545.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Chambless, D. L., Sanderson, W. C., Shoham, V., Bennett Johnson, S., Pope, K. S., Crits-Christoph, P., Baker, M., Johnson, B., Woody, S. R., Sue, S., Beutler, L., Williams, D. A., & McCurry, S. (1996). An update on empirically validated therapies. The Clinical Psychologist, 49, 5–18.Google Scholar
  8. Commission on Accreditation of Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE). (2015). Accreditation standards for graduate & post-graduate marriage and family therapy training programs, Version 12.0. In K. Jordan (Ed.), Couple, marriage and family therapy supervision. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  9. Crohn, J. (1995). Mixed matches: How to create successful interracial, interethnic, and interfaith, relationships. New York: Fawcett Columbine.Google Scholar
  10. Erickson, B. M. (2005). Scandinavian families: Plain and simple. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  11. Falicov, C. J. (2005). Latino families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  12. Falicov, C. J. (2014). Latino families in therapy. New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  13. Fischer, M. S., Baucom, D. H., & Cohen, M. J. (2016). Cognitive-behavioral couple therapies: Review of the evidence for the treatment of relationship distress, psychopathology, and chronic health conditions. Family Process, 55(3), 423–442.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Forgatch, M. S., & Kjobli, J. K. (2016). Parent management training-Oregon model: Adapting intervention with rigorous research. Family Process, 55(3), 500–513.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Garcia Preto, N. (2005). Puerto Rican families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  16. Giordano, J., McGoldrick, M., & Guarino Klages, J. (2005). Italian families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  17. Glazer, N., & Moynihan, D. P. (1963). Beyond the melting pot. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
  18. Glazer, N., & Moynihan, D. P. (Eds.). (1975). Ethnicity: Theory and experience. Cambridge: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Greeley, A. M. (1974). Ethnicity in the United States: A preliminary reconnaissance. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  20. Green, R. J. (1998). Training program: Guidelines for multicultural transformation. In M. McGoldrick (Ed.), Revisioning family therapy: Race, culture, and gender in clinical practice (pp. 115–117). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  21. Hall, S. (1987). Minimal selves. In H. K. Babha (Ed.), Identity: The real me: Post-modernism and the question of identity. London: Institute of Contemporary Arts. (ICA Documents, No. 6, 44–46).Google Scholar
  22. Hardy, K. V., & Laszloffy, T. A. (1992). Training racially sensitive family therapists: Context, content and contact. Families in Society, 73(6), 363–370.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Hardy, K. V., & Laszloffy, T. A. (1995). The cultural genogram: Key to training culturally competent family therapists. Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 21(3), 227–237.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Jalali, B. (2005). Iranian families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  25. Jordan, K. (Ed.). (2016). Couple, marriage, and family therapy supervision. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  26. Karis, T. A., & Killian, K. D. (Eds.). (2009). Intercultural couples: Exploring diversity in intimate relationships. New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis Group.Google Scholar
  27. Kelly, S., & Hudson, B. N. (2016). Diversity in couple and family therapy: Ethnicities, sexualities, and socioeconomics. Santa Barbara: Praeger.Google Scholar
  28. Kennedy, R. (2003). Interracial intimacies: Sex, marriage, identity, and adoption. New York: Pantheon.Google Scholar
  29. Killian, K. D. (2013). Interracial couples: Intimacy and therapy. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Killian, K. D., & Agathangelou, A. M. (2005). Greek families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  31. Kleinman, A. (1980). Patients and healers in the context of culture: An exploration of the borderland between anthropology, medicine, and psychiatry. Berkeley: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  32. Knudson-Martin, C., & Rankin Mahoney, A. (2009). Couples, gender, and power: Creating change in intimate relationships. New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Lee, E., & Mock, M. R. (2005). Chinese families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  34. Liddle, H. A. (2016). Multidimensional family therapy: Evidence base for transdiagnostic treatment outcomes, change mechanisms, and implementation in community settings. Family Process, 55(3), 558–576.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  35. McCrady, B. S., Wilson, A. D., Munoz, R. E., Fink, B. C., Fokas, K., & Borders, A. (2016). Alcohol-focused behavioral couple therapy. Family Process, 55(3), 443–459.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  36. McFarland, W. R. (2016). Family interventions for schizophrenia and the psychoses: A review. Family Process, 55(3), 460–482.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. McGill, D. W., & Pearce, J. K. (2005). American families with English ancestors from the colonial era. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  38. McGoldrick, M., & Garcia Preto, N. (1984). Ethnic intermarriage: Implications for therapy. Family Process, 23(3), 347–364.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  39. McGoldrick, M., Pearce, J. K., & Giordano, J. (Eds.). (1982). Ethnicity and family therapy. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  40. McGoldrick, M., Marsh Schlesinger, J., Hines, P., Lee, E., Chan, J., Almeida, R., Petkov, B., Garcia Preto, N., & Petry, S. (2004). In F. Walsh & M. McGoldrick (Eds.), Living beyond loss (2nd ed.). New York: Norton.Google Scholar
  41. McGoldrick, M., Giordano, J., & Garcia Preto, N. (Eds.). (2005). Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  42. Moore Hines, P., & Boyd-Franklin, N. (2005). African American families. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  43. Murry, V. M., Smith, E. P., & Hill, N. F. (2001). Race, ethnicity, and culture in studies of families in context. Journal of Marriage and the Family, 63(4), 911–914.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Newbeck, P., & Wolfe, B. (2015). Loving v. Virginia (1967). In Encyclopedia Virginia. Retrieved from http://www.EncyclopediaVirginia.org/Loving_v_Virginia_1967.
  45. Parra-Cardona, J. R., López-Zerón, G., Domenech Rodríguez, M. M., Escobar-Chew, A. R., Whitehead, M. R., Sullivan, C. M., & Bernal, G. (2016). A balancing act: Integrating evidence based knowledge and cultural relevance in a program of prevention parenting research Latino/a immigrants. Family Process, 55(2), 321–337.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Pew Research Center. (2012). The rise of intermarriage. Washington, D.C.Google Scholar
  47. Rastogi, M., & Thomas, V. (2009). Multicultural couple therapy. Los Angeles: Sage.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Regier, D. A., Kuhl, E. A., & Kupfer, D. J. (2013). The DSM-5: Classification and criteria changes. World Psychiatry. 12(2): 92–98. Retrieved 17 Jan 2017: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683251/
  49. Root, M. P. P. (2001). Love’s revolution: Interracial marriage. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Rosello, J., Bernal, G., & Medina, C. (1999). Individual and group CBT and IPT for Puerto Rican adolescents with depressive symptoms. Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, 14(3), 317–344.Google Scholar
  51. Rosen, E. J., & Weltman, S. (2005). Jewish families: An overview. In M. McGoldrick, J. Giordano, & N. Garcia Preto (Eds.), Ethnicity and family therapy (3rd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
  52. Santisteban, D., Coatsworth, J. D., Perez-Vidal, A., Mitrani, C., Jean-Guilles, M., & Szapocznik, J. (1997). Brief structural strategic family therapy with African Americans and Hispanic high risk youth: A report of outcome. Journal of Community Psychology, 25, 453–471.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  53. Santisteban, D. A., Coatsworth, J. D., Perez-Vidal, A., Kurtines, W. M., Schwartz, S. J., LaPerriere, A., & Szapocznik, J. (2003). Efficacy of brief strategic family therapy in modifying Hispanic adolescent behavior problems and substance use. Journal of Family Psychology, 17(1), 121–133.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  54. Santisteban, D. A., Suarez-Morales, L., Robbins, M. S., & Szapocznik, J. (2006). Brief strategic family therapy: Lessons learned in efficacy research and challenges to blending research and practice. Family Process, 45(2), 259–267.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  55. Santisteban, D. A., Mena, M. P., & Abalo, C. (2012). Bridging diversity and family systems: Culturally informed and flexible based treatment for Hispanic adolescents. Family Psychology, 2(4), 246–263.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  56. Sue, S. (1998). In search of cultural 11competence in psychotherapy and counseling. American Psychologist, 53(4), 440–448.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  57. Sue, S., & Zane, N. (1987). The role of culture and cultural techniques in psychotherapy: A critique and reformulation. American Psychologist, 59(4), 533–540.Google Scholar
  58. Sue, S. & Zane, N. (2006). Ethnic minority populations have been neglected by evidence-based practices. In J.C. Norcross, L. E. Beutler, & R. F. Levant (Eds.), Evidence-based practices in mental health: Debate and dialogue on the fundamental questions. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. 61: 38 345–359.Google Scholar
  59. Sue, D. W., Bernier, J. B., Durran, A., Feinberg, L., Pedersen, P. B., Smith, E. J., & Vasquez-Nuttal, E. (1982). Position paper: Cross-cultural counseling competencies. Counseling Psychologist, 10, 45–52.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  60. Sue, S., Zane, N., Nagayama-Hall, G. C., & Berger, L. K. (2009). The case for cultural competency in psychotherapeutic interventions. Annual Review Psychologist, 60, 525–548.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Suzuki, L. A., Won, G., Masako Mori, M., & Toyama, K. (2016). Asian American couples and families. In S. Kelly & B. N. Hudson (Eds.), Diversity in couple and family therapy: Ethnicities, sexualities, and socioeconomics. Santa Barbara: Praeger.Google Scholar
  62. Szapocznik, J., Scopetta, M. A., & King, O. E. (1978). Theory and practice in matching treatment to the special characteristics and problems of Cuban immigrants. Journal of Community Psychology, 6(2), 112–122.CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  63. Weibe, S. A., & Johnson, S. M. (2016). A review of the research in emotionally focused couple and family therapy. Family Process, 55(3), 390–407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Multicultural Family InstituteHighland ParkUSA
  2. 2.Psychiatry Department, Rutgers University, Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolHighland ParkUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mudita Rastogi
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Argosy UniversitySchaumburgUSA