Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Cultural Competency in Couple and Family Therapy

  • Christiana I. AwosanEmail author
  • Yajaira S. Curiel
  • Mudita Rastogi
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_472

Name of Entry

Cultural Competency in Couple and Family Therapy

Synonyms

Contextual factors; Cultural attunement; Cultural awareness; Cultural consciousness; Cultural humility; Cultural literacy; Cultural multidimensionality; Cultural responsiveness; Cultural sensitivity; Diversity; Intersectionality and social justice; Multicultural perspective

Introduction

Over the past four decades, the field of Couple and Family Therapy (CFT) has attempted to move from a broader focus of gender and cultural awareness to a more specific emphasis on ways to train clinicians and researchers to focus on particular groupings such as gender (e.g., females), race (The authors distinguish and present the categories of race and ethnicity as separate but related concepts. Race is categorized as the phenotypic presentation of one’s skin color and ethnicity as a cultural heritage of one’s ancestry. Although the classification of individuals on the basis of external markers (racial categorization) has been...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christiana I. Awosan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Yajaira S. Curiel
    • 2
  • Mudita Rastogi
    • 3
  1. 1.Seton Hall UniversitySouth OrangeUSA
  2. 2.Palo Alto UniversityPalo AltoUSA
  3. 3.Illinois School of Professional PsychologyArgosy UniversitySchaumburgUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Mudita Rastogi
    • 1
  1. 1.Illinois School of Professional Psychology, Argosy UniversitySchaumburgUSA