Encyclopedia of Couple and Family Therapy

2019 Edition
| Editors: Jay L. Lebow, Anthony L. Chambers, Douglas C. Breunlin

Multisystemic Family Therapy

  • Scott W. HenggelerEmail author
Reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-49425-8_165

Introduction

Multisystemic therapy (MST®) is a family- and community-based mental health intervention that has been most extensively validated for the treatment of serious antisocial behavior in adolescents (e.g., conduct disorder, violent offending, sex offending, substance abuse) and has also been adapted and evaluated for the treatment of other challenging clinical problems such as child maltreatment and serious emotional disturbance. MST is one of the most widely disseminated evidence-based treatments for adolescents and their families, with programs in more than 30 states and 15 nations and a capacity to serve 23,000 youth and families annually. Across dissemination sites, the fidelity of MST programs is supported and monitored through an intensive and well-validated quality assurance/quality improvement system.

The primary aims of this chapter are to provide (a) an overview of MST clinical procedures and the quality assurance system that aims to optimize therapists’ adherence to...

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Family Services Research CenterMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Corinne Datchi
    • 1
  • Ryan M. Earl
    • 2
  1. 1.Seton Hall UniversitySouth OrangeUSA
  2. 2.The Family Institute at Northwestern UniversityEvanstonUSA