Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Sequence Stratigraphy

  • Arthur D. Donovan
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_282-2
Sequence stratigraphy is an informal chronostratigraphic methodology that uses stratal surfaces to subdivide sedimentary successions. Unlike most traditional lithostratigraphic units (NACSN 1983), which are defined as regionally mappable packages (members, formations, groups) of similar lithologies (rock types), sequence stratigraphic units trend across traditional lithostratigraphic boundaries (Fig. 1). This methodology owes its origins to the pioneering work of Caster ( 1934), Sloss ( 1963), Campbell ( 1967), and Asquith ( 1970). All of these workers documented that stratal surfaces trend across traditional lithostratigraphic boundaries, and concluded that stratal surfaces represent time-significant boundaries that can be used to define coeval packages of strata contained within different lithostratigraphic units (Fig. 1).
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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.British PetroleumHoustonUSA