Encyclopedia of Coastal Science

Living Edition
| Editors: Charles W. Finkl, Christopher Makowski

Headland-Bay Beach

  • Luis J. Moreno
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-48657-4_165-2

A headland is defined in common language as: (1) a point of usually high land jutting out into a body of water: promontory; (2) high point of land or rock projecting into a body of water. Therefore, a headland-bay beach is a beach whose shape is mainly conformed by the fact that it is located between such headlands, or at least adjacent to one. Some of the synonymous terms that can be found in literature to describe a headland-bay beach are: bay-shaped beach, pocket beach, zeta bay, bow-shaped bay, and half-heart bay. This type of feature shows a gradually changing curvature which Krumbein (1944) noted resembled that of a logarithmic spiral curve.

Johnson (1919) gave an incisive description of wave refraction caused by headlands along an embayed coastline, and Krumbein (1944) showed a simplified diagram of wave refraction into a bay lying to the lee of a headland. According to Yasso (1965), a headland was considered to be any natural or artificial obstruction that extended seaward...

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© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Subdirección General de Actuaciones en la Costa, Dirección General de Costas, Secretaría de Estado de Aguas y CostasMinisterio de Medio AmbienteMadridSpain