Encyclopedia of Animal Cognition and Behavior

Living Edition
| Editors: Jennifer Vonk, Todd Shackelford

Transposition

  • Olga Lazareva
Living reference work entry
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-47829-6_1527-1

Synonyms

Definition

Transposition is a form of relational learning in which a learned relational response (e.g., smaller) transfers to a novel pair of stimuli after a simultaneous stimulus discrimination training.

Introduction

The first transposition experiment has been designed by Wolfgang Köhler (1918/1938). In these experiments, chickens and chimpanzees were presented with a two-alternative simultaneous discrimination in which a response to a darker shade of gray was not reinforced and a response to a lighter shade of gray was reinforced (or vice versa). Once the original discrimination was learned, the subjects were given a choice between the original, light shade of gray and a novel, still lighter, shade of gray. Köhler proposed that learning to respond to a specific shade of gray (absolute responding) should result in a preference for the original gray shade; however, learning to respond to the relationship between the two shades (relational responding)...

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Drake UniversityDes MoinesUSA

Section editors and affiliations

  • Dawson Clary
    • 1
  1. 1.University of ManitobaWinnipegCanada